OUTDOOR TRAINING

BENEFITS OF OUTDOOR TRAINING

(Original article edited and added to from Mens Health)

You Only Need 5 Minutes

Park your excuses. According to Environmental Science and Technology journal, just five minutes walking in green space is enough to reduce stress and increase your motivation to stay active. In their research, those who exercised within view of a river or lake experienced the biggest mental boost. Best reroute that commute.

Fresh Air Open Space

Long runs, a PT providing varied outdoor exercises and a cool breeze to speed recovery.  Why did we use gyms in the first place?!

A Park Run Burns More Calories Than a Treadmill

Wind resistance lifts your calorie burn by up to 10%, according to Harvard Medical studies. However, it’s your joints that really stand to benefit here, as the firm, flat surface of a treadmill places more stress on your knees and ligaments. Time to rage against the machines.

Training Outdoors Boosts Your Self-esteem. But Which Type of Exercise is Better?

If you’re chasing the feelgood factor rather than a PB, a stroll should be your activity of choice. Big ideas to pitch at work? Turn your next brainstorming session into a Silicon Valley-esque power-walking meeting. It’ll give your confidence an upgrade.

Booking an Outdoor Fitness PT Makes You More Likely to Stick to it

Men who train in the open air enjoy it more, according to research by Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, while Canada’s University of Sherbrooke found higher attendance rates for outdoor sessions compared to gym classes. More space and less queuing were cited as reasons. A respite from gurning bros and chart remixes probably helps too.

It Will Keep Your Vitamin D Topped-up

Five to 30 minutes twice a week will keep your D levels at optimum, according to the National Institutes of Health. That’s a weekday jog and Sunday morning calisthenics in the park. Schedule sessions for 11am-3pm when the sun’s rays are at their strongest. Don’t overdo it though; no summer six-pack will make up for a lobster’s complexion.

Does Gardening Count?

Ain’t nothing weedy bout weeding! A Konkuk University study found that digging and mulching counts as a proper workout. Weeding has been given an MET score of 5 (that’s it’s ‘metabolic equivalent’ value; anything over 3 is considered high-intensity). Digging scored highest with a value of 6.3 – the same as weightlifting.

Heat Things Up

Your gym’s aircon could be freezing your fitness gains. In a University of Oregon study, cyclists saw a 7% improvement in performance after 10 days of ‘heat exposure’ training.

Exercising in warm weather improves your ability to regulate body temperature and helps the heart pump more blood to your muscles. Returning to the gym

Stay Calm and Keep Exercising

Stay Fit while WFH / isolating

Hi guys, here at boxingtrainer.london I decided to write a blog helping you to get your daily exercise routines going.

First thing to say is that following the PM’s guidelines means if you don’t have the virus or haven’t been told to stay home you can all exercise outside in the fresh air. This can be on your own or with a trainer at a safe distance.

I’m going to give you some outdoor workouts you can try and some indoor workouts for if you are in actual quarantine and cant leave the house.

Make sure you gently warm up and stretch before and after the exercise.

Outside workout 1

Interval walking/jogging/running

5 minutes easy pace then.

2 minutes medium effort / 1 minute fast effort

Repeat x 5

Then the following x 2/3 times.

Squats x 30 seconds (45/60secs if advanced)

Press ups x 30 seconds

Bench steps x 30 seconds

Sit ups on the ground x 30 seconds

The Plank 60 seconds.

Outside Workout 2.

Warm up jog. 5 minutes.

Then circuits: each exercise done for 1 minute and do the circuit 3 times (rest if needed in between)

Shuttle sprints

Press ups

Burpees

Bench step ups

Star jumps

Boxing sit ups

Shadow boxing

Indoor at home workout 1.

Jogging or marching on spot to warm up 2 minutes.

Then 10 seconds of: star jumps, burpees, high knees, spotty dogs, press ups.  Now time for the workout..

Walkouts x 10

Press Ups x 10

Boxing Sit Ups x 20

Shadow boxing x 30 seconds

Burpees x 10

Tricep Dips on sofa or chair x 10

Shadow boxing x 30 seconds

Russian twists x20

Squat Jumps x 20

Repeat x 1, 2 or 3 depending on fitness levels.

 

Indoor home workout 2.

(if you have a small dumbbell then great, if not then do more reps!)

Squat into overhead press x 20 reps

Shadow boxing 1 minute

Squat into overhead press x 15 reps

running on spot 1 minute

Dumbbell swings x 20

Shadow boxing1 minute

Dumbbell swings x 15

Burpees x 20

running on spot x 1 minute

Burpees x 15

Shadow boxing 1 minute

Press Ups x 20

running on spot 1 minute

Press Ups x 15

shadow boxing 1 minute

Glute leg raises (donkey kicks) x 20

running on spot x 1 minute

Glute leg raises (donkey kicks)

Shadow boxing

Then cool down and stretch.

For more advice contact me or to book in a PT session then let me know via contacts page.

Paul

www.boxingtrainer.london

email: boxingtrainerlondon@icloud.com

 

 

 

Tyson Fury v Wilder

How I see it going

What is it?
Deontay Wilder vs Tyson Fury, the rematch. The first fight ended in a controversial split-decision draw.
When is it?
The fight will take place on February 22 2020.
Where is it?
MGM Grand, Las Vegas.
What TV channel will it be on?
BT Sport Box Office.

The low down
For starters both men know what the last fight took out of them and secondly one of them at least will be a lot more prepared this time around.
Tyson Fury has had two more fights since that fight, he’s fitter, stronger and more confident. The first fight he had been out of the ring for more or less 3 years. This time he will be physically better. He’s also took Wilders best shot and got up from it, unbelievable.
However, just because he got up the first time doesn’t mean that if he gets hit hard again this will happen again. He will also be wary of Wilders punch and so will he be more cautious?
Throw in that Fury has had a very severe cut only 6 months ago, this will come into play.
Also Wilder is the home fighter and judges can be at times biased to the home favourite.

The outcome prediction
Fury does not want to hang around and get caught by Wilders punch, he could also get cut early on on that eye of his.
These 3 things both suggest to me that Fury will look to or even have to win by knockout by round 7. So Fury wins by knock out. Round 5.
These are just my views 🙂
Paul Carroll
www.boxingtrainer.london

ENERGY DRINKS – THE TRUTH

Energy drinks are supposed to do just what the name implies — give you an extra burst of energy. As it turns out, most of that “energy” comes from two main ingredients: sugar and caffeine. A typical energy drink can contain up to 80 milligrams of caffeine (about the same amount as a cup of coffee). By comparison, a 2006 study found that the average 12-ounce soda contains 18 to 48 mg of caffeine.

Other than caffeine levels, how do energy drinks differ from sodas and sports drinks? Soft drinks are mainly water, sugar and flavouring. They don’t do anything for your body; they’re just supposed to taste good. Sports drinks are designed to replenish fluids lost during activity. They typically contain water, electrolytes and sugar. Energy drinks have added caffeine and other ingredients that their manufacturers say increase stamina and “boost” performance. They’re designed for students, athletes and anyone else who wants an extra energy kick.
Energy drinks became popular in Asia long before they reached the United States. In 1962, Japanese pharmaceutical company, Taisho, released its Lipovitan D drink. It was designed to help employees work hard well into the night. Lipovitan D contains taurine, the same ingredient found in many of today’s energy drinks.
The very first “energy” drink to reach the United States wasn’t really an energy drink at all — it was more of a hyped-up soft drink called Jolt Cola. The “jolt” in the cola was a lot of added sugar and caffeine. Introduced in the 1980s, Jolt Cola quickly became a staple of college campuses.
An Austrian businessman named Dietrich Mateschitz picked up on the cash potential of energy drinks while on a business trip to Asia. Along with two Thai business partners, Mateschitz started the company Red Bull GmbH, with the idea of marketing the drink to young Europeans. Many clubs on the American West Coast caught wind of the Red Bull phenomenon and began importing it to sell as a cocktail mixer.
Red Bull began distributing its drink in the United States in 1997. According to its manufacturer, revenues doubled each year, reaching more than $1 billion in 2000. Although Red Bull has consistently been the leader in the energy drink market, several other companies have launched their own energy drink lines. Many of them are endorsed by celebrities.

Some of the ingredients

…and what they do in the body:

  • Ephedrine – A stimulant that works on the central nervous system. It is a common ingredient in weight-loss products and decongestants, but there have been concerns about its effects on the heart.
  • Taurine – A natural amino acid produced by the body that helps regulate heart beat and muscle contractions. Many health experts aren’t sure what effect it has as a drink additive (and the rumor that taurine comes from bull testicles is false).
  • Ginseng – A root believed by some to have several medicinal properties, including reducing stress and boosting energy levels.
  • B Vitamins- A group of vitamins that can convert sugar to energy and improve muscle tone.
  • Guarana seed – A stimulant that comes from a small shrub native to Venezuela and Brazil.
  • Carnitine – An amino acid that plays a role in fatty acid metabolism.
  • Creatine – An organic acid that helps supply energy for muscle contractions.
  • Inositol – A member of the vitamin B complex (not a vitamin itself, because the human body can synthesize it) that helps relay messages within cells in the body.
  • Ginkgo biloba – Made from the seeds of the ginkgo biloba tree, thought to enhance memory.

Looking at the ingredients, energy drinks appear to be part soft drink and part nutritional supplement. According to reviewers, the taste falls within the same range. People who have tried energy drinks have described the taste as ranging from “medicinal” to “molten Sweet Tart.” Although the manufacturers claim that energy drinks can improve your endurance and performance, many health experts disagree. Any boost you get from drinking them, they say, is solely from the sugar and caffeine.
Caffeine works by blocking the effects of adenosine, a brain chemical involved in sleep. When caffeine blocks adenosine, it causes neurons in the brain to fire. Thinking the body is in an emergency, the pituitary gland initiates the body’s “fight or flight” response by releasing adrenaline. This hormone makes the heart beat faster and the eyes dilate. It also causes the liver to release extra sugar into the bloodstream for energy. Caffeine affects the levels of dopamine, a chemical in the brain’s pleasure center. All of these physical responses make you feel as though you have more energy.

Energy drinks are generally safe, but like most things, you should drink them in moderation. Because caffeine is a stimulant — consuming a lot of it can lead to heart palpitations, anxiety and insomnia — it also can make you feel jittery and irritable. Over time, caffeine can become addictive. It is also a diuretic — it causes the kidneys to remove extra fluid into the urine.

Online personal training is here!

Your comprehensive training program and meal planner will be written bespoke and tailored to your individual circumstances using the knowledge and experience I’ve gained in my 15 years working in the fitness industry at the highest level.

Whatever your goals, whether its losing weight, toning up, muscle gain or stress relief then I can and will I help you achieve them.

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Paul